Ray Nagin Winning Reelection

Saturday, May 20, 2006
And here is Paul at Wizbang's amazing preelection analysis predicting it. No way I would have guessed that, no way. Hats off to Paul, the force be with him.

15 comments:

JB said...

Well, in the very least it proves the thesis of how messed up NO is to the rest of the country. Hard to blame Bush for anything Katrina-related now.

MeaninglessHotAir said...

Nagin worked hard to bring in the votes from the NO diaspora. Lots of those folks will probably never return from Houston, Dallas, or Baton Rouge, but they did it for the home team. Still, his days are numbered.

terrye said...

It does not sound like the voters had much of a choice really.

Barry Dauphin said...

The choice was between the guy who decompensated and Mary Landrieu's brother. Mitch Landrieu was a few years behind me at Jesuit. I saw him act in school plays (we had a good theatre department). Mitch was very talented. Although he seemed to want to break the family mold early in his political career, he's now ensconced in the Democratic Party. The choice was awful, but the voters are responsible for that.

Glenmore said...

In a way Lt. Gov. Landrieu was a 'proxy' for state government efforts and results regarding Katrina, as Nagin was for city government. Neither excelled (nor did the Feds.) But just keep in mind that any government capable of excelling under such circumstances is capable of pretty much anything they want to do, good or bad, under other circumstances.

Skookumchuk said...

glenmore:

But just keep in mind that any government capable of excelling under such circumstances is capable of pretty much anything they want to do, good or bad, under other circumstances.

Well said.

Buddy Larsen said...

Chalk one up for derived Clintonism--life in the Big Revival Therapy Tent.

"I know I've messed up bad, folks, but haven't we all? Aren't we all sinners on this journey we're on?"

Praise the Lord (whenever anyone's in earshot).

David Thomson said...

This election is simply further evidence that New Orleans is a dysfunctional mess. May God Bless its citizens. They are in a near hopeless situation. And yes, they have no one really to blame but themselves.

Buddy Larsen said...

New Orleans suffers from something like the "oil curse", where fortuitous positioning--at the mouth of the Mighty Mississippi--creates economic fundamentals outside any need for a modern civic structure. As such, the Gen Benjamin Butler Reconstruction template is still in play enough to've created the SuperDome psychodrama the world witnessed during Katrina.

Skookumchuk said...

buddy:

Not so much within New Orleans itself. Most of the big industrial port facilities are in Plaquemines Parish and elsewhere in Louisiana. But your larger point is very true that these are facilities that handle massive volumes with very few people and while their terminal managers may be known to grain buyers all over the planet they may be unknown to people only a mile away. And their impacts on the local economy are insignificant - certainly not enough to lift them out of the morass. In that sense, the lower Mississippi is a piece of autonomous First World infrastructure stuck in the Third World, kind of like the Panama and Suez Canals.

David Thomson said...

As a citizen of Houston, I should cynically be happy that New Orleans is such a dysfunctional mess. At the turn of the 20th Century---New Orleans was a much more economically prominent city. It was the political corruption which discouraged further economic development. A lot business moved to Houston.

By the way, Sean Penn is staring in a new movie about Huey Long. This has got to be about the funniest thing I’ve heard for awhile. Penn likely considers the “Kingfish” to be some sort of populist hero. The reality is that Long is greatly responsible for Louisiana’s current troubles. Inadvertently, the Kingfish did more for Houston than New Orleans.

Buddy Larsen said...

Skook's and David's comments amplify one another most deftly. Butler's game during Reconstruction was to gather as many freedmen as he possibly could into the Ninth Ward and make them wards of Washington DC.

Many think the objective must've been the usual free-money graft, as the hidden crime committed against the future prospects of our most vulnerable new citizens is a century-and-a-half later more appalling than ever for the passage of frozen time.

David Thomson said...

New Orleans and much of Louisiana should be economically powerful. Alas, this is what happens when you elect populist politicians who are contemptuous toward the private sector. I’ll be blunt: voting for typical Democratic politicians is unwittingly the same thing as desiring the perpetuation of poverty and hopelessness. Do you want a growing economy that benefits everyone from the very poor to the very wealthy? In that case, you should always vote for conservative non-hypocritical Republicans who live up to their ideals.

Buddy Larsen said...

Conservatism is a tool with which to build a life; Liberalism is a life with which to build a tool.

Luther McLeod said...

That's a good one Buddy.