U.S. Base in Germany Closes After 60 Years

Saturday, December 31, 2005
U.S. Base in Germany Closes After 60 Years

I was at Rhein-Main the day of Reagan's inauguration; that is, the day the Iranian hostages were returned.

No word from Congressman Murtha's office on the delayed pullout of our troops in the German quagmire.

12 comments:

David Thomson said...

We should probably remove all of our troops in Germany. Unless there is something I am overlooking, there is no justification for this seeming waste of money. The real action is in the Middle East. If nothing else, we have for too long allowed the Germans to parasite off the United States. My ancestors must be encouraged to handle their own military responsibilities. Much of the widespread anti-Americanism in Europe is surely due to our allowing these people to play us for suckers. We are similar to parents who continue providing money to their spoiled teenagers. The kids soon learn to despise them.

Knucklehead said...

Seneca,

I was a green young knucklehead (as opposed to a moldy old knucklehead) when I landed there during Jimmah's administration. We were then shuttled off to some miserable military holding pen where, after just a few hours, somebody asked me if I was "willing" to go the Berlin Brigade. I had no idea what the Berlin Brigade was but since they were asking and leaving me the option, apparently, to Just Say No I figgered it couldn't be great.

So I asked where else I might go. My other option was to sit tight in that miserable holding pen for at least four days... "maybe as long as a couple weeks". When would I leave for Berlin? That night's duty train. So I said goodbye to lovely Frankfurt and never saw it again until I PCS'd Radland. To this day I am glad I made the choice to go to Berlin.

During Jimmah's Mad Rush to Futility during the hostage situation I spent a fair bit of time preparing for war - loading M60A1s on C5s and such.

The Berlin Wall is gone. Reagan is gone. We still have Jimmah and the Mad Mullahs of Iran. What a world.

Knucklehead said...

DT,

I agree re: troops in Germany. I'm sure they didn't complain about Rhein-Main since they wanted the facilities to expand the civilian airport. IIRC, however, they howled when we announced a drawdown of some two divisions from Germany a year or so ago - something about "punishing" them for their Iraq stance.

BTW, I'd also like to see our troops withdrawn from South Korea. Like Germany, SK is - or should be - capable of defending themselves.

Buddy Larsen said...

The one good geopolitical effect would be on whatever bad guys in Eurasia might be having an attack of ugly dreams. Our central Europe bases surely complicate life for those ugly dreamers.

David Thomson said...

Ironically, we are the parents and the Europeans are mostly children. Our constitutional government is far older than most EU nations. We are indeed the teachers, and they are the students. They have no one to blame but themselves for their predicament. No one forced these folks to embrace socialistic doctrines.

By the way, I am still convinced that there is, generally speaking, more freedom of expression in Iran than France. I will return to this issue as soon as time permits.

chuck said...

By the way, I am still convinced that there is, generally speaking, more freedom of expression in Iran than France.

I wouldn't try to make that argument. I agree that the official organs, most radio, television, and some newspapers, are quite circumspect. But if you read some of the discussion forums you will discover that the French love to talk and they are not nearly so much in lockstep as the Germans appear to be. France is at the center of Old Europe and I suspect as France goes, so will the rest. France is slipping into hard times, decisions need to be made and things could break rather suddenly. So let us not write off the French but rather support those sparks of sanity that remain.

David Thomson said...

Iran poses a great threat to the United States. The French are not even a slight risk in this regard. Although many Iranians are pro-American, those who hold power despise us intensely. This country, however, is authoritarian in nature. The political leaders will often look the other way if one stays out of their way.

Iranian bloggers are far numerous than their French counterparts. What explains this huge imbalance? The bloggers of France are never tortured or killed. No, they are instead intimidated by that country’s nonviolent totalitarians who will throw these individuals into jail or pursue them in the civil courts with lawsuits. Have we already forgotten what happened to Alain Finkielkraut? Is he suppose to be a great exception to the general rule? If not, other than the violence, what distinguishes France from Iran?

Peter UK said...

"US Troops Out of Occupied Germany"

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU ALL.

Buddy Larsen said...

Same atcha, Peter--and everyone else, too!

Auld Lange Zyne or however it's spelt.

Seneca the Younger said...

David, if you're going to convince me that France is less free than Iran, you're going to need to find some examples of, eg, mentally impared teenaged girls being executed for premarital sex in Marseille. Or Canadian reporters beaten to death by the police in front of the Ministry of Culture.

I just don't think this argument is supportable.

David Thomson said...

“David, if you're going to convince me that France is less free than Iran, you're going to need to find some examples of, eg, mentally impared teenaged girls being executed for premarital sex in Marseille.”

My remarks are severely restricted to the free expression of ideas. France is run by a bunch of nonviolent totalitarians who are enraged when anyone dissents from their politically correct dogmas. The Iranian government is merely authoritarian and more willing to look the other way.

You are also too hung up on the aspect of violence. The main thing is that France effectively silences it dissenters. This is what you need to focus on. I must once again ask, “Have we already forgotten what happened to Alain Finkielkraut?” Why is this question being ignored?

“Or Canadian reporters beaten to death by the police in front of the Ministry of Culture.”

Canada is already a quasi totalitarian nation. People have been investigated by the police merely for disagreeing with the politically correct dogma concerning homosexuality. Canada is only few years away from being another France. I am betting that this country will eventually split. Those citizens residing in the more conservative provinces will want to go their own way.

Seneca the Younger said...

My remarks are severely restricted to the free expression of ideas.

Then you should have said so, shouldn't you?

(By the way, this is insupportable too, at least until you can display the person openly beaten to death in front of the French Ministry of Culture by the police.)