The Right Thing To Do

Monday, July 10, 2006
Ralph Peters proposes a humane and definitive resolution to problems arising from the difficulty in interpreting the Hamdan decision. Effective implementation would eliminate all concerns regarding the existence of a possibility of mistreatment as well as putting to rest the question of how long prisoners may expect to be held. The solution has the additional benefit of being inexpensive in application and if applied efficiently would allow Justice Stevens to focus on more pressing matters. Such as retirement.

4 comments:

David Thomson said...

“the difficulty in interpreting the Hamdan decision.”

I have no difficulty interpreting the Hamden decision. It is just a piece of garbage. The Geneva Convention has nothing to do with with combatants not wearing uniforms. End of story. But aren’t the five judges who voted yes supposedly well educated and brilliant? So what? They are still idiots and have opted to approach law from a postmodernist perspective. Some people might be afraid to say that the emperor is naked. Nonetheless, I’m not among them.

Rick Ballard said...

DT,

This piece at American Thinker supports your view fairly well. It's a shame that Breyer, Stevens et al couldn't have a jihadi from Guantanamo paroled to them in order to achieve a better understanding of the nature of an illegal combatant.

Syl said...

I don't care what they think about the Geneva Conventions nor do I care what they decided re the Tribunals...

because the SC has NO jurisdiction to decide anything.

The SC usurpted the powers of the Congress on this one.

David Thomson said...

Justice Stephen Breyer is a second rate thinker. He essentially believe that the law is whatever he thinks it is premised on his benevolent and elite ideals. Would Breyer accuse me of misunderstanding his position and taking him out of context? Of course, I’m sure the man lies to himself. How can Breyer get away with this nonsense? He is left-winger associated with Harvard University. That means he doesn't have to earn what he gets in life. The Harvard degree gives him a free ride.